Archives For medical school

As promised before, I plan to write on topics related to my experience in medical school, graduate school, and the combination of the two. For those who do not know, I am a student in an MD-PhD program (thus the “MudPhud” in the title of the blog). The classic paradigm is one that follows a 2-4-2 model of training. Our particular program follows the following pattern:

  • 2 years of medical school – These are the preclinical years, where we study biochemistry, histology, pathology, physiology, pharmacology, and related topics. It is mostly lecture-based, though our school utilizes a problem based learning (PBL) model. A few graduate school courses are taken in parallel with medical school. 
  • 3.5-4.5 years of graduate school – We then transition to graduate school, where a few courses are taken in the first year of graduate school (third year in the program). After rotating in multiple labs during the previous years, we settle into a lab and perform research for the following years. This ends with the defense of a doctoral dissertation.
  • 1.5 years of medical school – These are the clinical years, where students practice on the wards in each of the required fields. This portion of training culminates in graduation from the medical school and thus the MD-PhD program.
  • After the program – Students take multiple paths, ranging from medical residency to a postdoctoral fellowship to work in industry. Most will go on to residency.

The challenge in the transition from medical school to graduate school is not an easy one. In medical school, one must acquire large quantities of data and share this knowledge at regular intervals (usually on written exams). One could consider it like a very fast treadmill where you do not have access to the controls. The treadmill will continue to push you, but you may feel challenged to keep up. Or you might not feel this challenge. To be honest, I did not find this to be too fast, but the challenge for me was the lack of control over my schedule, from an emotional standpoint. During this time, you build a rapport with a large group of classmates who will later become colleagues. The shared experience of medical school creates solidarity among this group.

In graduate school, things change. You are now on your own, in a place where you are now at the bottom rung once again. It is exciting on one hand, because you can now choose what to study and how to direct your education. On the other hand, you may feel lost. As opposed to a treadmill, this is more like jogging through a forest, where vision is limited. You can take breaks to reorient yourself, and you can move at your own pace. However, it is difficult to know whether you are making progress, how fast you should be moving, or whether you are completely lost. Your friends in medical school are now moving on, and you no longer share the rapport you previously had with them. This creates a distance, and it is often emotionally trying.

For as challenging as the graduate school transition might be, the benefits outweigh the drawbacks. You are now able to study what truly fascinates you. You have control over your schedule, and you determine your own pace. You have access to a vast array of resources, and you can take on additional projects outside of your program. For example, I found myself volunteering with mentorship programs, science fairs, and even with a community clinic. The challenges you face in graduate school make each success far more rewarding than if they were easy. A simple rotation or a year-long research project cannot create the same level of suspense, mostly due to their limited timelines and more structured projects. Failure begets learning. Success begets inspiration.

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